MARTIN MOORE - NEW MUSWELL HILL SHOWROOM
JUNE 6TH 2018



Martin Moore’s new Muswell Hill showroom has a fresh, modern feel which is perfectly in tune with its urban location. 

Effortlessly bridging classic and contemporary, the refined detailing in their furniture sets strong horizontals and verticals against a palette of warm neutrals. New emphasis is placed on materials, texture and the considered placement of colour, with retro/modern decorative elements including ribbed glass, smoked mirror glass and soft velvets in jewel colours.  Metals too are restrained: Honed, brushed, gleaming with luxury but never ostentatious. 

Kitchens are not just about the way things work and the ergonomics of efficiency.  They are also about the way we want them to look and feel.  There is sensory delight in these designs, creating great spaces to spend time alone or surrounded by friends and family.  Every Martin Moore kitchen is individually designed and built to order, producing highly functional spaces with the generous authenticity of real furniture and real craftsmanship.

 



The New Deco Kitchen




The New Deco Kitchen draws inspiration from the architects and craftsmen of the 1930s, but everything about this design is innovative; from ‘floating’ freestanding pieces to clever shadow-lines in the cabinetry.  The concept also focuses on the use of feature materials, including book-matched marble, plain and decorative limestone, metallics and veneered timbers. 

Throughout this highly sophisticated kitchen, texture offers both visual and tactile pleasure.  Mixed metals too, from brushed brass to stainless steel, bring yet another level of interest when set against the palette of simple neutrals.



The English Kitchen



Inspired by the neo-classical architect Inigo Jones, this concept derives from the classic proportions and features of English period furniture.

Muswell Hill sees Martin Moore pushing this much-loved design even further, bringing in modern elements such as plain, white metro tiles, ribbed glass in cupboard doors and, in the dining area, lush velvet banquettes framing a Martin Moore smoked glass and oak table. Specially commissioned glass pendant lights bring pops of rich colour.



The New Classic Kitchen



The New Classic Kitchen has long provenance in Martin Moore’s history and carries a sense of tradition and permanence.  

It’s a grand kitchen, but a thoroughly modern one too, with period proportions refined and adapted to embrace modern technology and zoning.  This includes the spacious walk-in larder which provides ambient storage but could also be designed as a wine store or cold room.



The Architectural Kitchen 



Combining English Oak with handpainted furniture, the Architectural Kitchen has notably long elevations and rows of overhead lockers.   

As with all Martin Moore designs, this is real furniture, designed and built to order. The panelling of the doors requires exceptional craftsmanship in its construction - especially when highlighted with chrome inlays, as in the Muswell Hill showroom.  These bring yet another level of subtle glamour to this collection.



Martin Moore, who celebrate their 43rd anniversary this year, were one of the very first handmade kitchen companies.  In the early days, they built their kitchens from reclaimed timbers, but soon began to develop their own hallmark style of classic, timeless, English furniture, designed and made to order with a quality which transcends fashion. 

Still family run, Martin Moore work across the UK and Europe, designing and building bespoke wooden kitchens, utility rooms, bathrooms, bedrooms, dressing rooms and freestanding furniture.

Everything is solidly, traditionally, custom-built in Martin Moore’s Yorkshire workshops and they undertake the entire installation, including fitting, painting and worktops.  They have their own stone company, Martin Moore Stone, and mix their own paints.  This end-to-end approach allows Martin Moore to install rapidly and efficiently… and to give a lifetime guarantee.

NORTHERN LIGHTS
APRIL 30TH 2018


Scotland’s East Coast offers glorious open countryside and some exceptionally fine buildings, including this early Victorian stone house on the Firth of Forth.

The only downside to such a northerly situation can be a lack of light, especially in winter. To counteract this, the owners of this house have opened it up at ground level to build a large kitchen extension, with tall windows, French doors, a high internal roofline and rooflights maximising every bit of daylight.  The result is a remarkable, airy, multi-purpose living space… with a handmade 
Martin Moore kitchen at its heart.  

The only downside to such a northerly situation can be a lack of light, especially in winter. To counteract this, the owners of this house have opened it up at ground level to build a large kitchen extension, with tall windows, French doors, a high internal roofline and rooflights maximising every bit of daylight. The architectural approach to managing a large open space is to create zones and this kitchen has several, running through from the large sitting room/home cinema into a semi-formal dining area.  This then gives onto the kitchen’s work zones, with informal dining, and then finally into the food storage and bar area - which ultimately links through to the original house. 



Wooden flooring throughout the sitting and dining zones gives way to limestone flagstones in the kitchen, creating yet another subtle marker.  Plans for the new extension were revised several times to ensure that each zone had enough circulating space - to keep it visually linked to, but spatially distinct from, neighbouring zones.   

Throughout the kitchen, the colours are organic, with a warm neutral base including the limestone floor and natural Bianco Eclipsia worktops.  Handpainted in bright blue, the island provides a dramatic pop of colour. 



This careful planning allowed Martin Moore’s William Rudgard to design a kitchen with excellent flow and furniture and appliances on a grand scale serving every kitchen function, from cooking to storage. The owners are busy professionals, but love entertaining friends and family at weekends, whether seated at the large dining table or perched around the island mixing it with the cook.  A traditional dresser holds china, glass and cutlery to serve both areas.

The Aga, with an integrated ceramic hob as backup, takes centre-stage in the cooking zone, housed in a grand chimneypiece which is part of the overall kitchen design.  Directly opposite, a Wolf oven is built into the island, which also has a prepping sink.



A broad corridor forms the link between the new kitchen and the original house.

The walls are flanked with purpose- designed cabinetry.  Shown here (left) is a multi-purpose run of low storage cupboards with a marble top.  It works as a bar at parties, a laying- out area or even a buffet for family gatherings. Glasses and jugs are stored above. 



Facing it across the corridor, the tall cupboards conceal an enormous double larder for dry foods together with a tall fridge, a small freezer and yet more storage for less used china and glass. 

URBAN BLUE
MARCH 28TH 2018


The extension has a stark ‘Huf House’ style and the original kitchen had a similarly clinical feel.  As soon as they bought the house, the clients were clear that they wanted a new, cosier kitchen for their young family.  Although they had briefly considered another hyper-modern kitchen, they were quickly converted to the contemporary classic look of 
Martin Moore’s handmade furniture. This was the perfect way to reconnect the space to the Victorian origins of the house.



This was never going to be a straightforward project. The height and scale of the furniture and appliances had to be carefully considered as there were several different ceiling heights. The design also had to work around an imposing structural steel column.

Because Martin Moore kitchens are entirely designed and made to order, there are no standard components. Toni Silver, a Senior Designer at Martin Moore, had free rein to create the clients’ perfect family kitchen within this challenging space. 

The cabinetry, from Martin Moore’s 
English collection, was deliberately kept quiet and restrained, echoing the period origins of the house and leaving room for vibrant, contemporary colours and patterns to take centre stage. The height and scale of the individually designed wall cabinets, mantel and larder units help redress the variation in ceiling heights. At the heart of the kitchen, the island is raised on legs to give a traditional, freestanding look.



Another of Toni Silver’s clever design solutions was to absorb the problematic structural steel column into a neat desk area. This gives it real purpose, and allows the rest of the kitchen to flow naturally around the window, island and cooking zone.



This is a very urban kitchen; clean-cut, highly functional but warm and bright with colour and rich in pattern and texture. The inky indigo paint chosen for the central island led to the clients choosing a palette of decorative blues, including the iridescent splashback tiles and on-trend geometric floor. 

LIVING ON A GRAND SCALE - MARTIN MOORE
FEBRUARY 22ND 2018


Although fairly recently completed, this house was built on a grand scale and in a period style using traditional materials.  The space for the kitchen was enormous (nearly 900 sq ft) so above all else, the clients wanted a well organised design to make coherent and fluent use of the massive space.  They also wanted to make sure that despite the space, and the sheer size of the furniture and appliances needed to fill it, the kitchen had a powerful sense of homeliness and family living. 

Situated on the top of a hill, the house has sweeping views across a spectacular valley.  Making the most of those views from all the key zones was another key priority for the designer.  



The biggest challenge, as the clients correctly identified, was posed by the size of the kitchen.  For both pleasure and convenience, they need to be able to use it ergonomically.  For 
Martin Moore’s designer John Davies, this required detailed analysis of their lifestyle, cooking habits and aspirations for the new kitchen before he could even start plotting out the design for and location of the furniture and appliances.

It also became clear that the appliances the client had originally asked for were going to be too small dimensionally, requiring a change up to larger models.  Overall, the kitchen needed to respect the aesthetics of the house, but have a classic contemporary feel.  To achieve this, the designer had to gracefully integrate the industrial feel of the super-sized steel appliances with the hand painted furniture.

The central island is the largest of its kind that Martin Moore has ever constructed.  Comfortably seating seven people, it is both the social and functional heart of the kitchen.



The breakfast cupboard holds everything from a kettle and toaster to the high-tech coffee machine.  Favourite cups and mugs for three generations of the family sit on the shelves above.

As extremely knowledgeable wine experts, the clients’ brief also included a specially fitted and equipped wine area, dedicated to comfortably enjoying fine wines with friends and family.  John was determined to make this area just as impressive as the main kitchen itself.  Every element of it is purpose designed and fitted out for a pleasurable wine tasting experience.

Equipped to a professional level, it includes a vacuum pump system designed to keep wine in premium condition as well as a sink, a wine fridge and specially fitted out storage for all the different types of glasses.  All of this sits comfortably within the purpose-built break-fronted dresser design.

Comfortable bar chairs surround the high central table (which is also just the right height for standing) all oriented to make the most of the exceptional countryside views.  The French doors open directly onto the terrace beyond.



The back kitchen is a multi-purpose area.  With a back door directly leading to the garden, it’s a perfect place for coats and boots as well as being somewhere to arrange flowers.  The two shelves above the coat rack were specially designed for outsize vases. An additional fridge/freezer also makes the back kitchen a perfect space for caterers to set up and work from when the entertaining is on a grand scale.



The walk-in pantry has ‘staged’ shelving stepped up at the back to raise items into view.  LED lighting underneath the shelves automatically turns on when the doors are opened. Wicker baskets keep vegetables in good condition and the solid marble shelf is perfect for storing ambient foods such as cheese.  

Well organised, highly functional, dramatic in scale but domestic in concept, this is a highly successful project for both the client and Martin Moore.



The designer, John Davies, commented, “It’s rare to be presented with such a large area in which to design and build a family kitchen.  It was also a pleasure to work with clients who derive such huge enjoyment from the simple love of cooking, drinking fine wine and spending time with their children and grandchildren.  I believe that this project pulls off the dual challenge of creating a really warm family kitchen on a grand scale.”


Kitchen Details


The cabinets are a combination of Martin Moore’s English and New Classic

  collections, painted in Soft Grey and French Blue 

Aged Bourne limestone floor from Martin Moore Stone

Main worktops:  Silestone ‘Lagoon’

Island unit worktop:  Unistone ‘Bianca Carrara’ 

Splashbacks: ‘Oyster’ glass with integral LED lighting

 
COOL & CALM - BY DESIGN
JANUARY 18TH 2018

This classic 1930’s Arts & Crafts style house in Surrey has gradually undergone a radical transformation.  

Upstairs and down, its fussy, dated decoration has been replaced by a classic aesthetic with more than a hint of New England style.  It’s home to a large family with teenage children, but, with clever use of storage and organisation, pulls off a cool, uncluttered look… and nowhere more so than in the kitchen.


Martin Moore designer Andrew Wartnaby worked with the clients to create a simple, beautiful kitchen on a large scale.  It’s a painstakingly planned room where absolutely everything has its own place, housed within bespoke cabinetry from the Modernist Collection


A great match to the 30’s architecture of the house, the furniture has a linear design with minimal, but well-considered decorative detailing, such as the mirror backed glass cupboard.  Much of the furniture’s hallmark style derives from its proportions and the unique way in which the cupboards are recessed, with a projection of just 50mm into the room.

The large central island is the heart of the kitchen, providing worksurface, prepping space and a sociable curved end for perching and informal eating.  Rather than have a second island, the kitchen features a large, multi-purpose Cook’s Table, which can be moved, giving the space a flexibility which is especially useful for parties.  The clients entertain often, usually on a large scale, and this is a kitchen designed to host gatherings of family and friends.

The rich tones of Walnut are used as a warm counterpoint to the handpainted furniture.  The island’s cabinetry makes a particular feature of the timber’s natural grain, used both vertically and horizontally to create a subtle decorative focus which also highlights the skills of the craftsmen in Martin Moore’s Yorkshire workshops.

The Aga was the only element of the previous kitchen which was retained.  Andrew Wartnaby sited it within a recess, creating a new mantel feature to define the cooking zone.  The Cook’s Shelf running behind is brilliantly practical for storage and display. 



There is no shortage of necessities, appurtenances and appliances in this kitchen - but they are all carefully stored behind the doors of purpose-designed cupboards.

The Larder Cupboard is lined with Walnut shelves and racks for packets, boxes, jars and cooking ingredients of all sorts.  Although shallow enough to keep everything on view, it holds all the essentials a busy cook needs and keeps them ready to hand. 

The Appliance Cupboard serves both the kitchen and the dining area.  It houses the clients’ extensive cookery book collection alongside bulky appliances including a KitchenAid, toaster, microwave and coffee machine.  The drawers below are fitted out to hold cutlery and kitchen/dining room linens.


Kitchen Details:

Cabinetry: Martin Moore Modernist Collection, custom built to order
Painted in Martin Moore’s ‘Bark Grey’
Floor: Edessa Limestone from
Martin Moore Stone
Worktops: Bianca Eclipsia Quartzite

FINDING THE VIEW
DECEMBER 4TH 2017


The owners of this house moved to Jersey when they retired, buying an impressive chateaux-style property with exceptional views across the splendid bay. The kitchen however, situated at the back of the house, was shut off from that view. To remedy this, the layout was changed entirely, moving a staircase and replacing the rear wall with an orangery extension, opening the space up to the sea and sky.
 
Pam Baker at Martin Moore had designed their previous kitchen in England and came to Jersey to see the new space and take a brief. The clients asked her to create an inviting new kitchen with soft styling and a light, coastal feel. It also had to have a built-in bar area for weekend entertaining.



Inspired by its setting, the colours throughout this kitchen are determinedly soft and natural, from the American Black Walnut island to the aged limestone floor and antique mirror glass behind the cooking zone, which is defined by a generous mantel. The cabinetry too, is painted in rich neutrals - with a splash of stunning sea blue on the full height cupboards which conceal the fridge and freezer. There is a strong sense of this kitchen having always been there.
 
The same blue, Little Greene’s ‘Bone China’, a gentle reference to the seaside location, is picked up inside the twin glazed cupboards, highlighting carefully chosen pieces of china and glass displayed inside.
 
The cabinetry is in Martin Moore’s New Classic design; perfectly suited to the house. Decorative detailing is minimised, letting the quality of the traditional cabinetmaking, the timber and the other materials in the kitchen shine through. Window treatments and upholstery have also been kept to a minimum to maintain focus on the coastal views. 



Jersey’s warm climate means that the Aga is switched off for several months of the year. Back-up is provided by eye-level built-in ovens and a pair of two-zone induction hobs which flank the Aga to maintain symmetry. A Quooker boiling water tap and a warming oven were other must-haves, as were the two dishwashers; one serving the kitchen and one, located within the island, serving the separate bar area.
 
Every Martin Moore kitchen is designed and built as a one-off. There are no standard components and everything is made, by hand, to order, in their Yorkshire workshops. This allowed Pam Baker to respond in every detail to the brief. This included three different sink areas, one on the island and the other two within the long L-shaped run of cabinets, which houses many of the kitchen essentials in a carefully planned array of drawers and cupboards.



Worksurfaces throughout are in Caesarstone, contrasting the marble-veined ‘Dreamy Marfil’ colourway on the island with the tonal ‘Shitake’ on the perimeter cabinets.  There are subtle contrasts in the cabinetry colours too, with the kitchen hand-painted in Little Greene ‘Rolling Fog’ and the bar in Farrow & Ball ‘London Stone’.
 
Situated halfway between the kitchen and the comfortable seating area, the bar area is a luxurious, flamboyant centrepiece. The tall cabinets for glassware and bottles have mirror-backing and special glass shelving imbued with LED lighting, making the whole area sparkle by night.
 
The L-shaped bar which defines the area has beautiful American Walnut top and wall cladding, matching the kitchen island and giving a ‘gentleman’s club’ feel.  Specially fitted out cupboards hold bar equipment and accessories. 

NEW - WOOD EFFECT PORCELAIN COLLECTION
NOVEMBER 16TH 2017

Martin Moore Stone’s new Wood Effect Porcelain Collection provides great flooring solutions, combining the look of real wood with the performance of porcelain.
 
Thinner, more stable and more durable than real wood, it’s an ideal surface for high traffic or high humidity rooms including kitchens, playrooms, hallways and bathrooms.  Because it is frost-resistant, it can also be laid outside on terraces or patios. The collection includes six authentically coloured and textured timber effects, from the driftwood look of Rustic Oak to the rich, warm tones of Cherry and Walnut (shown above: American Oak).
 
Martin Moore Stone offer an exceptional range of wall and floor tiles, from limestone, marble, terracotta and porcelain to a wide selection of decoratives. They also supply exterior stone paving and fireplaces in natural stone and marble. 
YORKSHIRE BLUE
NOVEMBER 1ST 2017

Building an extension to this late Victorian North Yorkshire home was the only way to gain room for a big, new family kitchen.

Recommended to the house’s owners by a friend, Martin Moore designer Matthew Sedgwick was briefed before the building works began. This allowed him not only to oversee the correct placement of all the utilities, but also to feedback his ideas for the space into the building process. 

One of his priorities was to design an architectural feature to bring interest to the longest wall and create a visual ‘centrepiece’ for the kitchen. A deep recess was built to hold the cooking zone, with a break-fronted chimney breast and timber mantel lending a classic look. An impressive range cooker holds pride of place, with dedicated storage cupboards and workspace on either side. The recess is lined with polished Carrara marble and features a useful cookshelf, perfect for keeping cooking essentials such as salt and oils to hand.





‘A blue kitchen’ was in the brief right from the outset, but the colours went through many potential shades and combinations before settling on Martin Moore’s ‘Summer Sky’ for the fitted cabinetry, ‘Cove Blue’ for the island and interior of the large glazed dresser and ‘Blue Grey’ on the drinks servery dresser and outside of the glazed dresser.  Hand-painted, these subtly related colours highlight the unfussy good looks of Martin Moore’s ‘New Classic’ cabinetry.



Every Martin Moore kitchen is designed and handmade to order in their Yorkshire workshops, with no standard components. Built round the clients’ busy lifestyle, this kitchen has many ‘dedicated’ areas including the large glazed dresser for glass, cutlery and crockery storage and the appliance cupboard, keeping the kitchen beautifully organised. 

Throughout the rest of the kitchen, the worksurfaces are in ‘Bianco Massa’ polished quartz composite. The floor, Cartmel Honed Limestone from Martin Moore Stone, is in the same rich but neutral palette. 
MARTIN MOORE - THE NEW DECO KITCHEN
OCTOBER 9TH 2017


Founded in 1975 as one of the very first handmade kitchen companies, Martin Moore’s hallmark style has always been classic, timeless, English furniture with a quality which transcends fashion. The style has never stood still though, and over the years a refined contemporary look has emerged.  

The New Deco Kitchen marks an important milestone, as the first kitchen to be wholly designed by Richard Moore, the second generation of the Moore family.  He brings new materials and new looks to the kitchen, taking ‘classic contemporary’ into a new realm.



As with all Martin Moore kitchens, every piece of the New Deco Kitchen is custom designed and handmade in their Yorkshire workshops.  It draws inspiration from architects and craftsmen of the 1930’s, whose Art Deco designs featured clean, geometric lines and decorative materials shaped by exceptional craft skills. Likewise, this highly architectural design has remarkable construction and detailing which calls on the exceptional skills of the Martin Moore craftsmen. 

Whilst acknowledging its 20th Century inspirations, everything about the New Deco Kitchen is new, from the ‘floating’ freestanding pieces to the clever shadow-lines in all the cabinetry. Modern framing replaces traditional cornices and doors are either flush or simply framed without beading. Another important design signature is the use of feature materials, including porcelains and metallics, for both cladding and inset panels. These give this kitchen limitless design potential. 
NEW - DECORATIVE TILE COLLECTION
SEPTEMBER 28TH 2017

 
Martin Moore Stone’s new decorative stone collection provides the perfect edit of today’s on-trend looks. Geometric themes in rich colours reflect the move back to pattern in our homes.
 
Shown above and below are ‘Jamaica’ and ‘Caicos’, two colourways of a modular design which can be laid in several ways to create varying designs. The pattern is contemporary, but the tiles are made using the traditional encaustic technique, giving a distinctive depth of colour and matt finish.  
 
Martin Moore Stone offers an exceptional range of wall and floor tiles, from limestone, marble, terracotta and porcelain to a wide selection of decoratives. They also supply exterior stone paving and fireplaces in natural stone and marble. 

AN ORGANIC ASSEMBLY
AUGUST 2ND 2017

 
Working with repurposed buildings requires exceptional sensitivity and design know-how. Functionality can be slotted in seamlessly, but the forms must connect with authenticity to the original structure.
 
Originally a church assembly hall, this building sends the first glance upwards, to the towering roof with its cast iron spans and clerestory window lines. Set against this, the Martin Moore kitchen brings the eye back down to comfortable ground level, with warm tones, natural materials and the unmistakable look of real furniture, built on a grand scale in response to the setting. 
 
With lighting, storage, functionality and work space all needing equal consideration, the design, by Toni Silver at Martin Moore, started from one long island running directly down the centre of the room, with a lowered end adding an unfussy detail. Overall, the furniture is designed to seem as if it has been assembled, rather than fitted into the space.

Because Martin Moore kitchens are entirely built to order in their Yorkshire workshops, there are no prescribed designs or sizes to limit either the client’s brief or the designer. This allows a completely bespoke response which respects and enhances the architecture of the room whilst putting every inch of space to its most effective use.  



The island houses a dishwasher, recycling bins and drawers for cooking equipment and crockery. A capacious double sink is set into the lively natural Quartzite worksurface used both on the island and around the hob where it features as a worksurface, upstand and cook’s shelf.  Antique mirror glass behind the hob throws light back into the room. In a major feat of engineering, an extractor fan was installed into the sloped ceiling above the hob. Brick pillars on either side form a visual connection to the building’s history.     



Commissioned by a client who knows food, cooks brilliantly and likes nothing better than a party, this is an intensely social space with every modern convenience.  Not only is the kitchen an ideal gathering space but there are also two sets of double doors opposite the hob.  Opening through into a large party room, they create a perfect flow through the building and the garden living space with its outdoor sofas and cooking fireplace.
 
Additional storage is provided by shallow cupboards which flank the double doors and capacious drawers on either side of the range.
 
All the craft and tradition which built the assembly hall is reflected in the furniture: Designed using combinations of different materials, proportions and finishes and with a number of witty, highly individual, touches, it looks to have been put together organically rather than in any way imposed on this extraordinary space. 



There is both drama and glamour in this design. Drama in the sheer scale of the furniture and glamour in the luxurious palette of colours and materials used.
 
Smaller details have big impact too; from the glint of copper inside the pendant lights to the hot pink interior of the beautifully fitted out larder cupboard.  More than anything else, it is built around the client… in the case of the banquette seat, literally so. Over six feet tall, he wanted somewhere where he was able to stretch out comfortably with the Sunday papers, making this bench seating, with its storage beneath, an excellent multi-purpose area for both quiet time and social events.
 
Kitchen details
All cabinetry from Martin Moore’s ‘New Classic’ collection, combining hand painted elements in Martin Moore’s ‘Cobalt’, ‘Dove Grey’ and ‘Hot Pink’.
 
Worktops: Natural Quartzite
MARTIN MOORE MASTERCLASS WITH HOUSE & GARDEN
JUNE 20TH 2017

Martin Moore and House & Garden jointly hosted a Masterclass with Lee Westcott, one of the UK’s most exciting and influential young chefs. Chef/Patron of The Typing Room in Bethnal Green Town Hall, he has just been awarded 4 AA rosettes for his innovative modern food. Martin Moore’s beautiful Notting Hill showroom offered the perfect venue for a celebration, giving twenty-five House & Garden readers a rare opportunity to see Lee in action outside his own kitchen.  

Preparing a seasonal menu focused on British product, he wowed everyone’s palates with his cooking, which has been described as “pure, natural and honest.” A beautiful kitchen, spectacular food and the chance to see a top chef working close-up…. The perfect recipe for an unforgettable event.
MARTIN MOORE STONE NEW E-COMMERCE WEBSITE
MARCH 27TH 2017


Martin Moore Stone has launched a brand-new website, bringing together its extensive range of new and antique stone floors and fireplaces. Offering e-commerce for the first time, the site is entirely built around customer service; with design inspirations, detailed specifications, advice, sampling and even delivery bookings. The new website is supported by a new brochure full of inspirational imagery. 

Martin Moore Stone grew out of Martin Moore’s bespoke kitchens, sharing the same reputation for classic English design values.  Its new and antique stones offer iconic varieties in colours, textures and finishes to suit everywhere from traditional country houses to minimalist urban interiors. Also on offer are bespoke floors which are designed and made to order using a combination of materials including slate, marble and antique stone.

Natural limestones and marbles are seen again in Martin Moore Stone’s fireplace collection, which features just the right degree of architectural detailing for both period houses and modern living. Bespoke fireplace designs are also available to order.

martinmoorestone.com
CROSSING CONTINENTS
FEBRUARY 9TH 2017


Bringing the breezy outdoors lifestyle of Sydney right across the world to England’s Home Counties, this kitchen was designed in response to a very specific brief. It needed to be the heart of a new home for a relocated family with both teenagers and younger children. Particularly so because the parents have a packed social calendar, making family time especially precious. Another key element of the brief was their love of the seamless indoor/outdoor lifestyle to which they were so accustomed to in Australia.  

A modern build with an Arts & Crafts feel, the house lent itself to the open plan contemporary kitchen for which the clients had asked. Very clear in their vision, they had a long list of elements which needed to be incorporated into the design. These included a homework area/home office situated within the kitchen, an indoor drinks station serving the outside barbeque area and a dedicated juicing zone complete with organic waste bins. 



For Martin Moore designer Pam Baker, one of the earliest tasks was to establish a good flow for the room. It’s an extremely large space with dominant areas of glass at both ends and required expert planning to get the feel and the ergonomics right. The key to maximum functionality was to have two large islands; one focused on cooking (with an extractor in the ceiling above) and the other on prepping, in addition to which they both offer dedicated storage. Forming a work zone at the heart of the kitchen, they are served on one side by a wet zone and Appliance Cupboard, and on the other by tall wall cupboards housing state-of-the-art appliances. Shown below, the double doors between the ovens and the fridge/freezer appear to be cupboards but in fact give access to a large walk in pantry behind. 



Both islands feature Caesarstone ‘Osprey’ worktops and side cladding. This was requested by the owners who have a vision of living in this house for many years and wanted to make the sides of the island extra-resistant to knocks and bangs of lively children enjoying playing in the kitchen space. 



Likewise, the ‘homework station’ (seen below) will become a home office for adults in the due course of time, but meanwhile, it provides an organised space for children to work, whilst still being in the ‘flow’ of the kitchen. Flanking it on the left is a handwash sink and to the right a dedicated drinks zone with fridge drawers and a wine cooler. Both zones are sited and designed to serve the outdoor BBQ kitchen as much as the indoor cooking and eating areas. 



The kitchen furniture, made to order in Martin Moore’s Yorkshire workshops, combines hand-painted elements with oak - in direct homage to the Arts & Crafts aesthetic of the house, which features oak doors and window architraves. Blue walls add on-trend modernity.

MOVE OR IMPROVE
DECEMBER 6TH 2016


The owners of this classic 1930’s Surrey detached house inherited a Martin Moore kitchen when they moved in in 2005.  They lived with it happily for years until the time came for their children to leave home and the “move or improve” question came up.  Having spent years creating a wonderful mature garden, the grounds became one of the key reasons to stay put and completely renovate the house, giving it a new, contemporary look throughout.

A large three storey extension at the back of the house provided the space for a brand new kitchen/living space.  What had previously been a rather narrow and slightly dark space was more than doubled in size to become an airy new room opening straight onto the garden with tall bi-fold doors.  

The existing Martin Moore ‘English’ kitchen, which was more than ten years old, was removed before the extension build started.  But still in perfect condition, it was gifted to another member of the family who used it to build her own ‘new’ kitchen. 



Meanwhile, back in Surrey, the new space was being planned down to the last detail by Pam Baker at Martin Moore’s Esher showroom.  She designed and equipped the island as the aesthetic and practical centrepiece - the meeting point where kitchen functionality and social space cross over. Its form is mirrored by a wonderful, square oak kitchen/dining table, also built by Martin Moore. 

Planning out from the island, two walls were used to create distinct zones - both served by the island.  On the back wall, a sophisticated and highly equipped cooking zone is situated at one end, including extra-wide ovens, a 4-zone induction hob plus gas burners and hidden extraction.  At the far end of the run, the wet zone includes a sink and integrated dishwasher.  The two areas are united by a practical high-level cookshelf, with base and top cupboards providing dedicated storage.  The combination of natural oak and handpainted furniture in this kitchen creates a fresh, modern, relaxed look, perfect for open plan living.



On the side wall, the symmetrical plan has a roomy Appliance Cupboard at its centre.  Bi-fold doors open to reveal a built in coffee machine and microwave, with other large appliances including a toaster and mixer plugged in and ready to use on the shelf below.  The drawers beneath house napkins, placemats, cutlery and other table-laying necessities.  Identical sets of double doors flank the Appliance Cupboard:  One side houses a large fridge/freezer whilst the other provides crockery and pantry storage. 

Pam Baker also designed the elegant freestanding oak cupboard. Its glazed doors display simple, modern tableware, whilst its ¾ height provides a perfect place to display a big vase of flowers or bowl of fruit. 

Set back behind the cooking and prepping zones, Martin Moore also built a completely fitted out utility/laundry room.  The whole project demonstrates how even large kitchens require extremely detailed planning, from ergonomic zoning right down to the level of where individual items - from the ironing board to the toaster - will live.  This level of planning creates kitchens which can be both highly functional and intensely sociable… which exactly fulfilled the brief for this completely bespoke kitchen. 

The furniture is Martin Moore’s ‘Architectural’ design and the extensive new kitchen/living space is united throughout by an ‘Aged Caxton’ limestone floor from Martin Moore Stone.  Its warm tones chime with both the oak furniture and the elements which are hand painted in Martin Moore’s ‘Stone 2’… perfectly matched by Caesarstone ‘Osprey’ worktops.  Martin Moore signature back plate handles with a cylindrical knob are in brushed chrome, adding another note of modernity to this contemporary classic design.

THE HEART OF A FAMILY HOME
OCTOBER 6TH 2016



This magnificent kitchen is the new heart of a family home. A place where three generations come together to cook, eat, relax and enjoy quality time. It’s the second kitchen which these clients have commissioned from Martin Moore, the first being for a holiday house. This new project, in their Wirral home, is on an altogether grander scale, occupying a purpose built extension with a commanding view of the surrounding gardens.

Martin Moore designer Matthew Sedgwick designed both the holiday home kitchen and this new one. Involved right from the first discussions of the project, it was Matthew who suggested an extension both as the way to gain space for the new kitchen and to make sense of the room flow through the ground floor of the house.  Pushing out from the original house, it mirrors a large modern conservatory extension at the other end of the building, connecting ‘inside with outside’ in new, very useable ways and restoring the symmetry of the building. 



Light and bright, the kitchen hits a ‘classic contemporary’ note which perfectly suits both the house and its owners, with their large family of children and grandchildren. Cooking and eating together was one of the key drivers of both the form of the kitchen and its functions, but an unfussy, uncluttered aesthetic was just as important. The architecture of the original house has an Arts & Crafts feel, which is subtly referenced in the proportions and detailing of the new kitchen.

Large areas of glass walling limit the physical area available for kitchen cabinetry, so Matthew Sedgwick devised two L-shaped runs, one fitting within the other to create a brilliantly ergonomic solution. The outer run includes a beautifully fitted out larder cupboard, an appliance cupboard housing the microwave, toaster and other electricals on top with crockery below, and a tall fridge freezer. The return has been cleverly extended visually to run out into the glass roofed area, creating generous space for the large hob feature flanked by ovens and extensive storage. 

Mirroring the L-shape, the island puts every facility within immediate reach. Two warming ovens situated just below worktop height directly face the hob zone for ideal functionality. Other seamlessly designed-in conveniences include two separate sinks, a dishwasher, bins and additional storage.  A deep overhang creates an informal seating area.  



The adjacent round table provides kitchen dining for immediate family, with a large more formal dining room close by - accessible either straight through the house or, in fine weather, straight across the terrace.  As part of the kitchen, Matthew Sedgwick also designed a purpose-fitted utility room which leads out through a boot room into the garden, keeping all wet or dirty tasks out of the main kitchen area.

Because Martin Moore kitchens are entirely built to order in their Yorkshire workshops, there are no prescribed designs or sizes to limit either the client’s brief or the designer. This allows a completely bespoke response which respects and enhances the architecture of the room whilst putting every inch of space to its most effective use.  As this kitchen shows, this level of thoughtful organisation and zoning is just as crucial to large kitchens as to small ones.  



Kitchen details

All cabinetry from Martin Moore’s ‘Architectural’ collection, combining hand painted elements (colours from Paint & Paper Library ‘Stone’ range) and natural oak with a lacquered finish

Worktops: Caesarstone Osprey quartz (polished)

Floor:  Aged Melbury limestone by Martin Moore Stone

CASE HISTORY: CLOTH HALL
AUGUST 4TH 2016


Martin Moore designed and built this purpose-fitted dressing room in an extraordinary 14th Century building in Kent.  Originally a Cloth Hall, it housed traders selling fabrics including wool, silk and leather. Today this important building has been restored in every detail, transformed into a home which occupies a series of unique spaces.   

Although very familiar with period houses, creating a dressing room in a centuries-old roof with a sloping floor, randomly angled walls and prominent beams was an exciting challenge for Martin Moore’s designer David Sant.  However, as every piece of furniture is individually designed and made to order, it was a case of responding to each separate wall, providing organised space without compromising the room’s essential character.

Handbuilt in Martin Moore’s Yorkshire workshops, in American Walnut with nickel handles, the furniture is as solidly constructed as the house itself, with an authenticity which perfectly complements this exceptional building. 



Tall breakfronted cupboards occupy one entire wall, with shelves and drawers optimising space above and below the hanging rail.  A separate set of shelves holds a fabulous collection of designer handbags. The impressive shoe collection has a cabinet all of its own, set beneath one of the most dramatically sloping walls. There are no doors on any of the cabinetry, both to conserve space and to ensure that everything can be seen. To help this, all of the units are backlit.

A dramatic island holds centre stage in the room. As with the tall cupboards, this is divided into ‘His and Hers’ sides. The top of the island has glass insets looking down into lit accessory bays, neatly sectioned to store and display watches, cufflinks, earrings and other small treasures. The roomy drawers below are leather-lined and compartmentalised to the owners’ specific requirements.

The result, was a triumph for Martin Moore’s responsiveness and abilities. David Sant describes it as, “Calm and consistent, using a very eccentric space to create a completely organised, personalised and luxurious dressing room. It’s a wonderful luxury.
UTILITY... MAKING THE MOST OF EXTRA SPACE
JUNE 23RD 2016

Whether it’s a utility room, back kitchen or scullery we dream of, we’d all love to have that little bit of extra space close to - but separate from - the kitchen. 

As masters of maximising space, bespoke kitchen makers Martin Moore are regularly commissioned to purpose-build back kitchens, utility rooms and walk-in larders alongside their main kitchens. Often these can be in surprisingly small spaces: Because the furniture is made to order, it can make the most of every inch.

The utility room shown here has several very specific purposes including ventilated lower cupboards specially designed for vegetable storage and an extra-large sink which the owners call their “soaking sink” – big enough to hold their largest pans. The space is also used as a bar whenever they hold large parties.  

Handpainted in the same off-white as the main kitchen it adjoins, the utility room has honed Nero Assoluto granite worktops and upstands. Glass wall cladding reflects light back into the room. 
COOL, CALM AND COLLECTED…
MAY 16TH 2016



The Danish couple who commissioned this Martin Moore kitchen bought a ‘tired’ 1970’s house in Surrey because it overlooked a beautiful lake and open woodland. They knew that they could build an entirely new house on the site, with all the bright, warm, open-plan space so typical of Scandinavian homes. 

In true Nordic style, they wanted the kitchen to combine the integrity of classic, hand built wooden furniture with a clean aesthetic. Martin Moore’s 
Architectural furniture provided both the perfect look and, very importantly, the ideal vehicle for the many functional considerations in the brief; a practical space with maximum work surfaces and storage, an extra-large peninsula rather than an island, to prevent small children getting underfoot and a splendid range cooker, perfect for baking.  

A super-organised space, with a very warm heart, this kitchen epitomizes the Danish concept of ‘hygge’ - enjoying the simple good things in life with people you love.



The clients were specific that they wanted the look to be uncluttered and the furniture was custom designed and built designed around this principle. The sheer size of the kitchen allows the generously scaled cupboards and drawers to house all kitchen and dining necessities, with purpose-fitted interiors creating beautifully organized spaces.  There are no wall cupboards and the large fridge and freezer are tucked away in an adjacent area - close to, but not in, the main kitchen space.

Aesthetically, the cabinetry features slender mid-rails to accentuate the linear design, and the drawers are flat fronted - without beading - giving a contemporary look.  Smaller details also contribute to the modern open plan look; from the simple cylinder knobs to the open shelving set around the bespoke extractor hood.  



The colours and textures are perfectly in tune. The furniture is hand painted in light grey (Little Greene French Grey Mid 162) and set against pure white walls which accentuate the calm mood.
 
Underlining the Scandinavian aesthetic, natural oak flooring has been used as a counterpoint to add warmth and tonality.  The worktops throughout are made of white Corian, perfect for a totally seamless look and particularly ideal for the worktop of such a large peninsula. 

BACK TO BACK KITCHENS
MARCH 30TH 2016

As kitchens have increasingly become both the functional and social hub of modern living, we have all had to learn to multi-task in even the most carefully zoned areas. But where there is space to create the ultimate, the new must-have is a ‘back kitchen’.

A back kitchen is definitively not a utility room… rather, it’s a modern take on the scullery traditionally found in large period houses. Today, it’s a purpose-designed space where busy cooks can delegate prepping tasks, store less frequently used china and glass, keep wine ready for parties and house back-up appliances such as an extra dishwasher and freezer. Ideal for people who entertain regularly, it keeps the main kitchen area uncluttered - even in the midst of a great party.


Martin Moore are increasingly being asked to incorporate back kitchens into their bespoke designs. The back kitchen shown here is painted in Farrow & Ball ‘Downpipe’. The worktop and upstands in ‘Organic White’ Caesarstone. 
HOUSE & GARDEN READER EVENT AT MARTIN MOORE SHOWROOM
MARCH 4TH 2016

Thirty-two House & Garden readers gathered for an inspiring cookery masterclass hosted by Martin Moore at their Notting Hill showroom and Chef Mark Hix, brand ambassador for Sub-Zero and Wolf.

Mark’s verdant, seasonal menu celebrated exceptional ingredients from British artisan suppliers including beef from Glenarm Estate, Little Wallop cheese and Wye Valley Produce asparagus. Whilst cooking, his commentary was packed with invaluable chef’s tips, such as using gluten free flour to create non-stodgy batter.  





Carrying through the British theme, each dish was beautifully assembled on bone china plates made in Stoke on Trent by William Edwards - creating a feast for all the senses.

Meanwhile, at the back of Martin Moore’s spacious showroom, Mark Hix’s brigade had been working hard cooking the same recipes to provide lunch for a - by then - extremely hungry audience! From the asparagus risotto to the buckthorne posset every mouthful was a culinary journey into springtime. 



The cookery masterclass rounded off with a House & Garden gift bag, which included a stylish Martin Moore cooks apron and recipes for all the delicious dishes demonstrated by Mark Hix.


A VERY ENGLISH AESTHETIC
JANUARY 15TH 2016

Drawing on the classic forms of English furniture, the elegant and well-ordered proportions of Martin Moore’s bespoke kitchens make them perfect for Georgian, Victorian and even modern homes. Every kitchen is expertly, traditionally, custom-made in their Yorkshire workshops.

Martin Moore’s 
English kitchen combines fitted and freestanding pieces to create a calm and ordered space. Evident in every detail of the furniture, its very English aesthetic is brilliantly applied to modern living. Elements include the imposing freestanding dresser combining storage and display with bi-fold doors concealing a sink, microwave and coffee machine. 

The cabinetry is hand painted in Martin Moore’s own paint in cream and pale grey, whilst the Caesarstone worktops reflect this neutral scheme, with ‘Ginger’ against the wall and ‘Dreamy Marfil’ on the island. A chic white metro tiled splashback completes the look.

MARTIN MOORE LAUNCH NEW WEBSITE
NOVEMBER 17TH 2015

Classic English furniture maker Martin Moore has launched a new website built around projects. Real life locations ranging from historic country mansions to city townhouses showcase the character and individuality of Martin Moore’s handmade, bespoke kitchens and furniture. They also highlight how perfectly the company’s essentially English style fits both traditional and contemporary living.

Celebrating its 40th Anniversary this year and undertaking work throughout the UK and Europe, Martin Moore remains a family business. From kitchens and utility rooms to dressing rooms and freestanding furniture, every commission is custom-designed and built in its own Yorkshire workshops and installed by its own craftsmen. The website also features Martin Moore’s own natural stone collection.

 

NEW MARTIN MOORE DISPLAY
SEPTEMBER 29TH 2015

 

Drawing on the classic forms of English furniture, the calm and well-ordered proportions of Martin Moore’s bespoke kitchens make them perfect for Georgian, Victorian and even modern homes, where they can be highly contemporary - as shown in the simple lines and minimal detailing of this ‘Architectural’ kitchen.

Combining painted hardwood and English Oak, the cabinetry is framed and panelled in a classic style which will never date and which works beautifully in both fitted and freestanding elements. White worktops, white walls and a pale stone floor underline the modern aesthetic. Taking this on a step further, the panels are framed with gleaming chrome inlays. A new design option within Martin Moore’s Architectural kitchens, this introduces a refined way to add discreet luxury or zone a large living kitchen.

Images show the new Architectural Kitchen display within Martin Moore’s Altrincham showroom, with a Martin Moore Stone floor.

 

MARTIN MOORE'S APPLIANCE CUPBOARD
AUGUST 17TH 2015


Blending the spirit of classic English cabinetry with the essentials of modern living, every Martin Moore kitchen is entirely individually designed and built.

Here, Martin Moore have created a large alcove to house a bespoke Appliance Cupboard. Every aspect of the cupboard has been designed in response to the owner’s needs. The fitted microwave and plumbed in coffee machine can be hidden away behind cupboard doors. These also conceal other bulky kitchen appliances such as juicers and mixers, ready to be slid forward when needed. China and glassware for informal dining at the breakfast bar is ready to hand and the cupboard provides dedicated storage for awkward pieces such as cake stands. Because the shelves are relatively shallow, it’s easy to see and access everything. A generous worktop runs the full width of the cupboard, with drawers below holding kitchen linens.

Part of Martin Moore’s 
Architectural Collection, this Appliance Cupboard combines the proportions of a classic English dresser with the modern aesthetic of simple, refined cabinetry. Gleaming chrome inlays highlight the timber. Underlining this contemporary look, the alcove itself is clad and framed in the same natural oak used to build the cabinet.

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